7 new city councillors: Here are their thoughts on active transportation

Bike Ottawa surveyed the candidates for City Council. We received about 1400 responses from 66 candidates. To make your life a little easier, we lifted the four open questions out of our survey and only from the 7 new councillors on council.

See below what the new councillors think of active transportation.

1. What do you hear is the biggest transportation concern in the ward? (Open ended question; this could be anything, from lack of sidewalks to slow transit to speeding to traffic jams)

Matthew Luloff (Ward 1 – Orleans)

Speeding on side streets and traffic on the 174. Lack of bike infrastructure for cyclists on main routes has also been a concern.

Laura Dudas (Ward 2 – Innes)

Not submitted.

Jenna Sudds (Ward 4 – Kanata)

After speaking with thousands of residents, by far the biggest challenge facing our community is how we move around Kanata North. We need a commitment to be included in LRT. We need reliable and efficient bus service, and investments in our roads, walkways and cycling paths.

Glen Gower (Ward 6 – Stittsville Kanata West)

Overall lack of infrastructure (roads and transit) to support rapid growth.

Theresa Kavanagh (Ward 7 – Bay)

With our community growing, dense traffic on east/west and north/south arteries has resulted in residential streets being used to circumvent traffic jams. When I am talking to voters at the door, speeding traffic on their residential streets is a major concern for them. Traffic calming measures to improve safety in our neighbourhoods, as well as improving transit routes and access, creating pedestrian friendly roadways and more integrated networks of bike paths and bike lanes are priorities to improve transportation congestion in the Ward. That is why LRT Stage 2 is such an important infrastructure project for Bay Ward. LRT Stage 2 will have a tremendous impact on Bay Ward, affecting the communities of Woodpark, Whitehaven, Queensway Terrace North, Bayshore and Crystal Beach-Lakeview. We need to ensure that the impact of LRT Stage 2 on our greenspace corridors is minimized, particularly in the Pinecrest Creek corridor. We also must ensure that there is good pedestrian and cyclist access to the LRT stations for transit users.

Shawn Menard (Ward 17 – Capital)

Main Street, Bronson Avenue and Bank Street in Capital Ward are all top of mind for residents. Safety, connectivity and user-friendliness are the major issues being raised. Connectivity is a major issue: ensuring that cyclists are not dumped out into a busy road with no protected infrastructure. It is one of the big impediments keeping people off their bikes

Carol Ann Meehan (Ward 22 – Gloucester South Nepean)

Traffic congestion, lack of infrastructure, poor roads.

2. The enormous success of the Adawe bridge (more than 1.5 million bike and walk trips in the first two years) and the Corktown bridge has proven that people appreciate having infrastructure that separates walking and cycling from automobiles. What is one thing your own ward needs to improve for people who walk and bike?

Matthew Luloff

We need to make cycling more convenient by providing bike racks and supporting the complete streets model with separated bike lanes to keep all road users safe.

Laura Dudas

Not submitted, but we found a snipped of info in the Ottawa Citizen that could fit in here:

“Ensuring east-end LRT stations provide adequate park-and-ride infrastrcture, bicycle parking and safe well-kit pedestrian infrastructure. Filling gaps in our cycling and pedestrian infrastructure.”

Jenna Sudds

The biggest complaint I receive from cyclists in Kanata North is (1) increased safety for cyclists on March Road and (2) a safe way to cross Carling Ave at Burke Road.

Glen Gower

Improved cycling and pedestrian infrastructure on Stittsville Main Street.

Theresa Kavanagh

Carling Avenue is neither pedestrian-friendly nor bike friendly – we need to be more ambitious about improving road, pedestrian and bike infrastructure.

Shawn Menard

Bank Street Bridge, Billing’s and Bronson all need safety and convenience improvements. Separated bike infrastructure is the answer to much of these issues.

Carol Ann Meehan

More connectivity of bike paths.

3. Do you think the city’s goals for cycling and walking infrastructure are achievable? Or perhaps not? Why? 

Matthew Luloff

We need to ensure cycling and walking is a safe option for commuters, and those with an active lifestyle.

Laura Dudas

Not submitted.

Jenna Sudds

Walking and cycling are the most desirable mode of transit, followed by public transit. I believe with dedicated outreach and education, and continued investment in the infrastructure needed to ensure safety – we can achieve our goals as a City.

Glen Gower

They are achievable with real commitment and leadership from councillors. In addition, we need some different approaches to how these issues are addressed in the suburbs, recognizing a significantly different environment compared to urban wards.

Theresa Kavanagh

The goals are achievable, but mainly because they are not ambitious enough.

Shawn Menard

As is so often the case, the policy documents which make up the cycling plan for the City of Ottawa are laudable and achievable, but the political will and the investment necessary to get there are lacking. It makes little sense to continue the path we are on in Ottawa – Continuing wasting money on brand new roads, rather than shifting to other, less expensive and healthier, forms of transportation.

Carol Ann Meehan

We are a suburban ward with insufficient bus routes and long distances to the core. Cycling is not an option for most – certainly not year round. We can achieve the cycling goals, but it is one piece of a transit puzzle. My ward needs infrastructure money to get people moving – biking is currently not the main priority.

4. Thank you for your participation. We will publish your answers online on our website eventually when the bulk of the answers is in so that voters can make informed decisions. Anything you like to add? This is your chance! 

Matthew Luloff

Though I am not a cyclist, I completely support active transportation and the separation of bikes from traffic. With regard to your question on speeds, 40km/h on residential streets, when enforced properly, is appropriate, however, I am very open to working with the cycling community to make our roads safer.

Laura Dudas

Not submitted.

Jenna Sudds

I believe we can do better as a City to encourage more active modes of transportation and greater use of public transportation. To do that we need to invest in the infrastructure needed and the outreach and education. These are important investments in our City that will pay dividends for years to come. It would be an honour to champion active transportation in our City.

Glen Gower

We’re fortunate in Stittsville to have the Trans Canada Trail running through our community. I’d like to find ways to enhance north-south connections to connect to the trail to enhance the overall recreation network.

Theresa Kavanagh

As an avid cyclist for both pleasure and for commuting to work, cycling and pedestrian infrastructure are important components of a strong overall transportation infrastructure.

Shawn Menard

Please find my full plan at shawnmenard.ca

Carol Ann Meehan

My ideal Ottawa has everyone either on LRT, a bus or on a bike. We must fund ALL these options, not one exclusively.